Tag Archives: Tallahassee Museum

A red wolf puppy peeks out of its artificial den at the Tallahassee Museum.

Red Wolf Pups at the Tallahassee Museum | July 2017

These puppies are running!  The Tallahassee Museum’s red wolf pups are three months old, and visibly larger than the last time we saw them.

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Rob Diaz de Villegas WFSU Media

If you’ve been visiting the Tallahassee Museum looking to catch a glimpse of their red wolf pups, you’ve been out of luck.  So far, anyway.  They’re growing fast, and their behavior is changing as they grow.  There is a pattern to my two shoot days with them.  After the animal exhibit trails close, they start to poke their heads out.  When the animal staff heads out on their cart, the four pups come out and explore. Continue reading

Red Wolf Pups at the Tallahassee Museum | June 2017

We’ll be visiting the Tallahassee Museum every few weeks to see how their four red wolf pups are growing.  If you missed it, we had previously visited the Museum when their mother was pregnant with them.  We also took a look at the Museum’s role within the overall effort to restore this native predator to the American southeast.  We also visited Saint Vincent National Wildlife Refuge, a red wolf island propagation site within the system.

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Rob Diaz de Villegas WFSU Media

Yesterday, the Tallahassee Museum reopened its red wolf exhibit.  Their four new pups are two months old, and they’re still kind of shy.  But, if you’re patient, you may get a look at one of them.  Last Friday, I took a camera down to get the shots in the video above.  After two-and-a-half hours, people stopped coming and little heads topped up from the wolf den.  Thirty minutes after that, perhaps they felt better about my presence; they came out and played with their dad for a few minutes (The mom came out for a total of ten seconds during my time there). Continue reading

Red Wolf at the Tallahassee Museum.

Red Wolf | A Local Predator Finds Help at the Tallahassee Museum

Join us at the Tallahassee Museum on April 15 for a screening of Reel South: Red Wolf Revival.  Red Wolf Revival is an award winning documentary on the wild population of red wolves, located entirely within North Carolina.  We will also screen two shorts about our local efforts to help this endangered predator.  Click to learn more.

REEL SOUTH is a co-production of UNC-TV, South Carolina ETV, and the Southern Documentary Fund (SDF) with major funding provided by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

Thanks to Tracy Horenbein for providing original, local music for this segment.  Tracy composed the score for our Roaming the Red Hills series last year.

Thanks also to Suzie Buzzo, Mike Jones, and the rest of the Tallahassee Museum animal staff for your help.

Rob Diaz de Villegas WFSU Media

I didn’t think they’d put us in the enclosure with the red wolves.

We’re at the Tallahassee Museum, and we just finished interviewing Mike Jones, the Museum’s animal curator.  He has just told us that negative portrayals of wolves in children’s stories have painted an unfair picture of them.  I guess I’m about to find out how unfair. Continue reading

Expedition Florida 500 Paddles to Highlight History and Conservation

Rob Diaz de Villegas WFSU-TV

This week, we take a short break from oysters and the ecology of fear for a new EcoAdventure.  We’ll be back in oysters next week, as we look at fear and coastal predators and find out about an ongoing experiment on Florida’s East Coast.  It’s an iteration of the tile experiment examined in this video (and which we will explore more fully in a couple of weeks).  This is a research method Randall, David & co. perfected during their NSF funded oyster study and which David will soon take to his Apalachicola Bay study.  Stay tuned!

In the video, Justin Riney says, “A lot of people don’t think conservation or history is that sexy.”  As a television producer who mainly works to create content on these and similar topics (namely ecology), I appreciate the creativity with which he has designed his mission.  Stand Up Paddleboarding (SUP) has become immensely popular over the last few years, and I have to admit that it made for a cool entrance as we waited for Justin to see him appear in the distance and see him paddle his way up to the beach.

A few interesting tidbits:

  • Justin’s travel plans call for him paddling a relatively short ten miles a day.  This allows him to stop in the towns he passes and get to know people along the way. The plan calls for paddling on six out of seven days a week.  The extra days come in handy when weather delays him.
  • Justin takes a picture of me taking a picture of the trash found during the Dickerson Bay Ocean Hour cleanup on February 2.

    Ocean Hour, the other main initiative of Justin’s Mother Ocean project, has active participation on four of the seven continents (anyone up for Ocean Hour Antarctica?).  Ocean Hour is from 9 to 10 AM every Saturday, anywhere that people want to go to a coast and clean up.

  • One of Expedition Florida 500’s partners is Viva Florida 500.  You can learn more about events celebrating the 500 years since Juan Ponce de León’s arrival in Florida here.
  • When Justin was going over what he packed for his yearlong trip, he mentioned books.  This intrigued me, as a year’s worth of reading seems like a lot of weight to carry on a SUP.  What he does is trade books along the way, usually reading about the places he’s visiting.  During his time in Wakulla, he read books by Gulf Specimen Marine Lab’s Jack Rudloe, at whose home he was staying.
  • The video above took place entirely on the Saint Marks National Wildlife Refuge, which has become one of my favorite places to shoot (and visit).  Dickerson Bay is part of the Panacea Unit, off of Bottoms Road.  As you drive down Bottoms, there is a nice sized salt marsh on either side of you in which there are usually plenty of birds (the Great Florida Birding and Wildlife Trail sign on Highway 98 outside of Panacea is the signal to slow down before your turn).  I first went there with Jack Rudloe, who dragged a net in the water and gave us a quick lesson in marsh ecology from the animals he caught (and quickly released).  The WHO festival took place in the St. Marks Unit, the central unit of the Refuge.  There were plenty of birds in Lighthouse Pond, as there were when we visited last year when Migratory Shorebirds were making use of the extensive wetlands on the property.

Music in the piece was performed by Hot Tamale (playing live at the Festival) and we featured the track Future 03 by Necronomikon Quartett.

The kayak we used to tape the community paddle was provided by the Wilderness Way.