Tag Archives: paddling

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RiverTrek Day 4: Dead Lakes to Owl Creek

Rob Diaz de Villegas WFSU-TV

The sounds I hear in my tent every morning sort of define where we slept that night. Alum Bluff had the barred owls, Estiffinulga had the rooster and boats launching. Dead Lakes had a low grinding noise that Doug Alderson identified by the campfire after our Wewa chinese dinner. Pine beetles were eating one of the pine trees we were sleeping under. He told Bob, the campsite caretaker, as the tree had to be removed before the beetles spread to other trees.

Before we started the day’s paddling, we stopped to look at the Dead Lakes.  A sand bar from the Apalachicola River trapped the Chipola River, killing thousands of trees.  These trees are still there.  There was a discussion yesterday about some or all of us paddling through the dead lakes into the Chipola, which meets up with the Apalachicola a few miles downstream.  In the end, we decided to stay on the Apalach.  As beautiful as the Dead Lakes are, we don’t want to miss any part of the River.

This is where the bluffs start getting much shorter and the sand bars get fewer and further between. In fact, for our first break we forewent a restfull sit in the sand for a scramble up Sand Mountain. Sand Mountain was created by the Army Corps of Engineer as they dredged the river. All that sand that was sitting at the bottom of the river was piled up into a 50-60 feet high mound. It takes patience to climb, using hands and feet as the mountain sucked them in. It was a great view if the river.

Doug Alderson, halfway up sand mountain.

Today, Alex Reed and Bryan Desloge rocket off ahead of the pack.  Me, I’m still slowing down to shoot things.  I envy Jennifer Portman of the Tallahassee Democrat.  She’s in a tandem with Chris Robertson, who paddles on without complaint while she stops to take notes, tweet, or take photos.  It reduces the risk that you bump someone or get your kayak turned around while changing a battery.  Of course, Doug Alderson is taking notes and photos for his Visit Tallahassee blog and possibly for the next book he does on paddling (he’s currently working on a book about the Seminole Wars).  He doesn’t seem to have as many problems as I do.  He, along with the majority of the paddlers, have guided kayak tours at the Wilderness Way.  They know what they’re doing.  Me, I’m happy to be here with them and pick up the occasional tip.

Our camp site is down Owl Creek.  The bluffs are lower in this part of the river and there are fewer sandbars.  I’m not sure what the correlation is.  But it does mean we have to paddle a mile-and-a-half off of the river to sleep tonight.  It’s a great creek, with a lot of cypress trees including a small island where you can paddle between them.  When we get to the camp site, Alex and Bryan say they’ve been there an hour-and-a-half.

Our support team was lights out, with Fred Borg procuring campsites and bringing homemade salsa.  Eddie Lueken and her husband Mitch Ross brought us quite a spread.  In addition to the delicious machaca (a beef dish), Eddie had made chicken and bean enchiladas, guacamole, and pico de gallo.  All home made.  This support team has really gone above and beyond for us.  Thank you!

Tonight we did ghost stories.  Doug Alderson has written a book of ghost stories, as it happens.  He performs his stories quite well, he sets everything up and even incorporated Fred’s lantern, which hung by the picnic tables (we went primitive camping the first two nights, Dead Lakes was a country club by comparison, but Hickory Landing is somewhere in between with a rudimentary restroom- a pit toilet with no sink- and no potable water or outlets).    He had a hard time getting started with everyone interrupting to ask questions, notably Jennifer- the reporter- asking what kind of shoes he was wearing in his story.  These are things I’ll remember about these guys.  The little phrases and inside jokes.  I’ll never look at a chicken box the same way again.

When everyone went to sleep, I was a little restless and wandered around the campsite.  I walked onto the boat ramp and turned my head lamp off and looked straight up.  This was the last night of the trip, the last time for a while that I would see all those extra stars that we don’t have in Tallahassee, framed by the silhouettes of the trees at the water’s edge.  It was a good last image before going to sleep.

For more information on Rivertrek, visit the official page.  This page is on the Riverkeeper web site, and you can further explore what they do for the river.  (They’re also on Facebook).

The Franklin County Promise Coalition is coordinating aide efforts for families that are being affected in Franklin County through their Bay Aid program.   As Dan told us in his original interview, over half of the residents of Franklin County depend on the river for their livelihoods.  Learn more about volunteering and other Bay Aid opportunities here.

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RiverTrek Day 4: From the Crew

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Josh: The highlight for me today was to see the terrain and flora/fauna change as we move down the river. Covering the distance we’ve traveled really demonstrates the range of diversity the river supports.

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Rick: Sitting beside the campfire tonight after wrapping up our fourth day on the river. I’ve had the opportunity to get a close up view of the Apalach and grow in my appreciation of a real community treasure.

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Doug:
Sun glinting off kayaks in morning. Eagles calling–parents teaching young. Flying with a monarch. Humming songs. Achy bones lower back–looking for sandbar cool swim. Powerful river speaking gently to me. Always flowing. Honored to paddle her waters even if for short while.

 

Bryan: Made the summit at little sand mountain! Bald eagles – mullet – gar – beautiful sunset tonight – stepped on a copperhead while changing – the jokes keep coming – great fun for a great cause!

Bryan, before switching boats, going to paddle power, and leaving us behind every day

Jennifer: The best company, the most wonderful food, only 22 miles to go. Wish the trek was not ending tomorrow. Can’t stop writing in 140 characters or less!

Chris:
Hard winds uplifting
Dip, drip, gliding toward camp
Friends on the river.

Alex: Yesterday, I pulled away from the group for about awhile. There I was an hour away from Tallahassee immersed in the sound of birds, the wind and the crickets…. the only human sound was the rhythmic sound of my paddle hitting the water… what a magical place to be.

Mike: Wonderful day on the river. Skied down Sand Mountain. Watched a fish tail so close I could touch it. Talked with hunters getting ready for deer season expressing their concern for the Apalachicola. Enjoying the diversity of our group that shares common ground of reverence of this river.

Micheal: Day four and everyone seems to have found their rhythm. We’ve worked hard to get to this point but now we’re all sad to think this is almost over. I joined this trip to enjoy friends and support the river, but I didn’t expect the education on such a complex issue. Thank you Riverkeeper!

Rob: We’re here at the last campfire of the trip. We’ve developed both a strange communal sense of humor and deep reverence for the river and the land and waterways it supports. Even as I’m distracted by their fireside jokes as I try to type, I know I’m going to miss camping and paddling with these guys.

Georgia: Amazing four days. Incredible journey. Energizing group! 24 miles to go. Thank you Apalachicola River, support team, and Trekkers!