Tag Archives: paddling

Kayaks parked at Piney Z. Lake in the Lafayette Heritage Trail Park.

Bike and Kayak EcoAdventure on Tallahassee’s Lake Lafayette

Video: Mountain biking, kayaking, and nature watching at the Lafayette Heritage Trail Park in Tallahassee, Florida.

Rob Diaz de Villegas WFSU-TV

Sunrise at Piney Z. LakeAs you can see in the video, a sunrise is always worth getting up for.  All the better if a sunrise that beautiful is a mere fifteen minutes from my house.  Moments before the sun peaked over the tree line to gaze at its reflection in Piney Z. Lake, we heard a ruckus of birds as they flew overhead.  We came to the Lafayette Heritage Trail Park for kayaking, mountain biking, and an airboat ride, but the reason you schedule a shoot at that time is for lighting and wildlife.  Florida Fish and Wildlife biologist Michael Hill told us that they’re getting the park onto the Great Florida Birding and Wildlife Trail.  My favorite critter of the day was the juvenile green heron you see at 0:32, but it was also fun to see anhinga, gators, and the occasional osprey.  The park also has gallinules, wood ducks (you can see a couple of wood duck boxes in the video), and over three hundred wood stork nests (located on Lower Lake Lafayette).

Tussocks on Lower Lake Lafayette

The Lower Lake Lafayette portion of the paddling trail is currently clogged with tussocks. When the water gets low, dead plant material accumulates and traps seeds. The seeds grow in these mats, which become floating islands when the water gets higher. The dead vegetation you see in this photo is a result of herbicides, the first step in clearing the trail.

My wife and I have been hiking the multi-use trails in the park pretty much since it opened a few short years ago.  We usually start in Tom Brown Park, make our way along Upper Lake Lafayette and then to Piney Z. Lake.  If we have the time, we head along the dam separating Piney Z. and Lower Lake Lafayette, and across the train tracks into the J.R. Alford Greenway.  Walking all that way, you get to wondering about the dams separating the lakes and the “fishing fingers” on Piney Z.  Those are remnants of the Piney Z. Plantation, which added the earthen dams and dykes in the 1940′s.  The fingers are an interesting feature, letting you walk towards the center of the lake and offering some nice views of the dykes that the City of Tallahassee turned into small islands when they made the park.  All of that damming has altered the hydrology of what was once a singular Lake Lafayette.  This is why the paddling trail on Lower Laffayette has been closed for the last year, as our recent big bad drought lowered the lake and caused it to become choked with vegetation.  The trail will soon be cleared and will open by Thanksgiving 2013.  Thanks to Michael and his airboat (and to Liz Sparks for setting us up with him), we were able to get a unique look at the lake and its floating islands of vegetation, called tussocks.  The dams prevent the Lake’s normal drought cycles, and so the trails require some extra maintenance.

Ardisia crenata

Ardisia crenata, and invasive plant found in the Lafayette Heritage Trail Park.

On land, the multi-use trails need maintenance as well, and there is one thing that any of us who use the park can help with.  Chuck Goodheart, who manages the trails, is looking for help with invasive plant species, in particular, Ardisia crenata.  This plant threatens to overtake native plants within the park.  The city had spent thousands of dollars to try and eradicate it, only to have it return.  Now they’re turning to people who use the trail.  People have learned to carry bags when they walk their dogs; we can likewise bag and remove the plants and their berries when we see them in the park.  In fact, there are bags for dog waste near the Piney Z. parking area.  If people buy into it, it should be a cost effective approach.

I want to thank Chuck for riding his bike on camera after recently having surgery on his foot.  And I want to thank Georgia Ackerman for once again lending me a kayak.  Todd Engstrom and I both got to try out the kayaks we’re taking on RiverTrek 2013, which is- oh my! – two weeks away.  Todd, Georgia, and Liz are a great group to paddle with.  RiverTrek gets me thinking about the connection between the Apalachicola River and Bay, and the bay’s ever important estuarine ecosystems.  This dynamic is at play on Lower Lake Lafayette, which flows into the St. Marks River, which itself flows into the St. Marks Refuge with its vast marshes.  Upper Lafayette has a sinkhole that drains into the Floridan aquifer, the source of water for most of north Florida and parts of South Georgia.  The aquifer also feeds springs that feed rivers that ultimately feed the Gulf.  Nature has this “six degrees of Kevin Bacon” thing going on, especially when it comes to the way water moves.  That includes rain and everything it carries with it from the roadways and lawns in the developed areas around Lake Lafayette. (Watch as David Kimbro explains the natural- and unnatural- nitrogen cycle, and how oysters can help). In all the years I’ve been coming here, I had no idea about this, or the why the dams were there or what their effect on the lake is.  I’m glad I had this “closer to home” EcoAdventure to get to know a familiar place a little better.

For more information on the Lafayette Heritage Trail Park, visit their web site.
You can watch a video I produced on greenways and trails in Tallahassee by visiting the new and improved Dimensions web site.
Music in the video by pitx and airtone.

Kayaks parked at Piney Z. Lake in the Lafayette Heritage Trail Park.

Turtle seen on Slave Canal, Florida kayaking trip.

Paleo River Adventure on Slave Canal

Rob Diaz de Villegas WFSU-TV

Video: Slave Canal EcoAdventure

Much like Slave Canal connects the Aucilla and Wacissa Rivers, this post serves as a bridge between our oyster reef and salt marsh videos (not that we’re done talking about Apalachicola by a long shot).  One of my favorite things on this blog is when we can make connections between rivers and the coast.  Of course, rivers provide much needed nutrients and fresh water to the estuarine ecosystems I just mentioned.  But to the many cultures that predate european settlement of our area, they served as the equivalent of Woodville or Crawfordville Highway.  It’s how they got to their Forgotten Coast seafood.
Old Growth Cypress Tree off of Slave Canal

An old growth Cypress tree fortunate not to have been logged. Judging from the size of its base, Joe Davis estimates that it could be as much as 1,000 years old.

Slave Canal is one of those places I started hearing about a lot when we started doing our EcoAdventure videos.  As soon as you get into the braided channels of the lower Wacissa, it’s easy to see why it’s one of the popular river expeditions in north Florida.  You’re paddling in a canopied river swamp where people have been paddling for several thousand years.  And minus some old growth cypress trees that have been logged in the last century or so, it looks much the same as it did when various native groups made use of the waterway to make seafood runs to the coast.  But it doesn’t look quite as it did when people first got there.

Evidence excavated at the Page/ Ladson and Ryan/ Harley sites points to people inhabiting what is now the Aucilla Wildlife Management Area for 12,000 years or longer.  At that time, Florida Fish and Wildlife’s Joe Davis told us, the ice ages were ending, sea level was lower, and the coast was further away.  Those first men and women walked on dry land where our canoes and kayaks passed over.  I can almost envision paleolithic man standing on one of the many ancient midden mounds as everything happens around him in time-lapse mode.  Rivers fill and flow to the Gulf, mastodons vanish, and different cultures come and go, piling shell and bone on to that same mound.  Pretty heavy stuff to think about on a fun Florida kayaking trip.

Slave Canal signSo how do you get there?  Here are links to a couple of maps. Florida Department of Environmental Protection put this PDF together with driving directions to two put in points along the Wacissa Paddling Trail. One is for the headwaters of the Wacissa, though Goose Pasture is closer by ten miles. It depends on how long you want to kayak or canoe. It’s about five miles from Goose Pasture to Nutall Rise on the Aucilla.  Goose Pasture is also a camp ground (first come first served, call 800-226-1066 in Florida or 386-362-1001 for more information).  Scroll down in the PDF for advice in finding the entrance to Slave Canal (hint- stay to the right). If you don’t find it amongst the braided channels of the lower Wacissa, you won’t find your take out at Nutall Rise.  You may also want a map you can take with you on the water.  The Rivers of AWE (Aucilla, Wacissa, and Econfina) Explorer’s Guide is available on the Wildlife Foundation of Florida’s web site.  It has detailed maps of the rivers with tips and suggestions, and is printed on water resistant paper.  It’s the map that Liz uses at the start of the piece.

Slave Canal is our third EcoAdventure on the Aucilla Wildlife Management Area.  We paddled the upper Wacissa and got some underwater footage of Big Blue Spring.  We also hiked the Florida National Scenic Trail along the Aucilla Sinks, where the Aucilla River goes intermittently underground, peeking out in “Karst windows.”  The WMA is a marvelous synthesis of history and prehistory, wildlife, and geology.  And, well, it’s full of these cool looking places.

Nigel Foster paddles Slave Canal

This is Nigel Foster, of Nigelkayaks. This link is to the trip gallery on his website.  As you can see, he’s been a few places.

Russell Farrow on Slave Canal

And this is Russell Farrow, Liz’s other guest. Russell is a co-owner of Sweetwater Kayaks in St. Petersburg, and you can see he’s been a few places as well. One of his passions is getting kids into the outdoors (and away from their screens).

Oyster shell on Slave Canal mound

I do one thing on this blog all year that takes place away from the coast, but I can’t escape oyster shells. For how many thousands of years have people eaten oysters on the Forgotten Coast? This shell was on Coon Bottom Mound, the largest mound on Slave Canal.

Turtle seen on Slave Canal, Florida kayaking trip.

I’m looking forward to the next EcoAdventure, whatever that might be.  If you have any suggestions, leave a comment.

Music in the video by Philippe Mangold.

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RiverTrek 2012: A Quick Look Back

Rob Diaz de Villegas WFSU-TV

On every RiverTrek Day wrap-up post I wrote about what I heard while I lay in my sleeping bag that morning.  This morning it was the buzzing of my alarm, and then I strained to hear anything else.  Walls do a much better job keeping sound out than the thin fabric of a tent.  Eventually I hear that gentle hum of cars and trucks.  Today’s trash day, so I know garbage and recycling trucks are coming.

Back to a more technologically civilized existence.  That means I can upload all the posts that wouldn’t make it from the tablet while using Rick’s or Micheal’s phones as hotspots.  And I can add a lot more photos.  The blog software lets you fudge the dates, so everything can show up in order and you can start at the beginning and look at what we saw along the way.  The best way to see it all would be to go back to what is currently page 3 and keep scrolling over the posts (every new post will push them down, so this won’t be true for more than a few weeks).  Or you can just jump to the beginning and go post by post.

I am fortunate and honored that I was invited to participate in this year’s event.  I hope we do it justice in these posts and in the two video segments set to air on WFSU’s dimensions program (and which I’ll post here).  There may be other bits and pieces to post as well.  We saw and learned a lot.

And I do want to thank everyone who helped me with the production side of things.  Georgia already thanked the support team, and I want to reiterate that.  Thanks Eddie, Mitch, Fred, Dawn and Rick.  Thanks as well to Captain Gill on the support boat, and a big thanks to Dan Tonsmeire for taking a videographer for two days and showing him the river (and for so many other things as well).

Thanks to WFSU videographer Dan Peeri and In the Grass, On the Reef Associate Producer Rebecca Wilkerson for your assistance on the production side of things.

Thanks to the paddlers for putting up with the cameras, my lagging behind when I went to get a shot, and the occasional bump from my boat.  And for making me feel welcome in this group.  Thanks to Rick and Micheal for the use of your phones as WiFi hotspots.  A big thanks to Georgia for posting diligently and keeping the outside world up to date when technology failed me.  Georgia and Doug Alderson did a fantastic job coordinating the trip and picking participants.  I can’t say enough about the experience of RiverTrek, and how much there was for us to shoot and write about.

Lastly, I want to thank my wife Amy for letting me go for five days and staying home with an increasingly active toddler.

I’m probably forgetting someone.  If I am, these posts are editable.

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Rivertrek Day 5: Owl Creek to Apalachicola

Rob Diaz de Villegas WFSU-TV

Every morning starts with interesting noises that hear from my sleeping bag.  I’ve been spending a lot of time listening, and I always hear other people up coughing, walking around.  Camping doesn’t always mean great sleep.  This morning, what I heard most was a constant ocean-like noise.  I know we were by mile marker 22, still pretty far from the Gulf.  I wondered if I could hear the tide, as tidal influence was to be felt not too much further up the river.  I asked about that, and was told that perhaps I was hearing the river current.

The one turtle on the Apalachicola that let me get close to it, on the last day.

A few miles into our paddle, we stopped by Fort Gadsden and Doug talked about the historical significance of the place.  Built during the War of 1812 by the British, they abandoned it at the conclusion of the war to a group of free blacks, escaped slaves, and various native groups.  Negro Fort, as it was then called, was a haven for escaped slaves until US troops fired a cannon ball heated in a stove into the fort’s gunpowder stores.  The explosion killed hundreds.  Doug had provided us the chapter about Fort Gadsden from his upcoming book on the Seminole Wars.  We stopped again at the site of another battle, at Bloody Bluff.

We were to stay closer together today, and keep someone with a map nearby (Doug, Rick, and Chris).  Rivers and creeks join and split off from the river in the lower twenty miles, and it would be a lot easier to get lost.  The plan was to take one last break at a small beach after the railroad bridge, at mile marker 3 more or less.  We would stick close together and paddle in line into the city for the people waiting for us.

The day’s paddling seemed a little slower, as we had an incoming tide and some head wind.  We also passed larger boats (including a shrimp boat) that kicked a lot of wake our way.  Sometimes it felt like I was paddling in oatmeal.  When it came time to get into formation, my lens started fogging up and I had to change cameras and switch my last good battery into the camera I had stashed behind my seat.  Georgia is yelling “come on Rob!” but I know I can’t not have this shot.  And it’s either video or stills, so I took video.

We were to come out of the main river and turn into the channel that runs alongside the oyster restaurants and Veteran’s Park, where people were waiting for us.  As we turned the corner to head to the park, I could see an adult form holding hands with a toddler- it was my wife Amy and my son Max.  I told Georgia I saw them and she told everyone, “On the count of three, everyone yell ‘Hi Max!’”  As much a I’ve enjoyed this trip, I couldn’t have been any happier to see them.

We got to the park, waved to our friends, family, and well wishers, and all that was left was the race.  And these guys don’t play fairly.  There was supposed to be a race for anyone who wanted to go touch the Gorrie Bridge.  As Georgia was trying to get them organized to start, Rick, Micheal, Josh, and Bryan just took off.  I wanted to tape this, but by the time I got my camera recording and turned around to get after them, they were pretty far ahead.  It got pretty close, with Rick closer to a beam on the left and Bryan closer to one on the right.  Competitive in both paddling and finding venomous snakes, Bryan Desloge took this one.

Commissioner Desloge (L) and Josh Bolick (R) paddle back after the race.

We all gathered at Up the Creek Raw Bar and ate together with each other and our loved ones.  We will all be sleeping in beds tonight.  We started in the thickest fog and emerged into tall bluffs and wide sandbars, climbing one of the tallest and sleeping on a couple of the sandbars (Estiffanulga sand is still on a lot of my stuff).  The bluffs got lower again and creeks and cypress swamps offered interesting side adventures.  Men fished and hunted, fishhooks hung from trees, houseboats and floating kennels lined the shores.  Herons evaded us, eagles circled overhead, and fish never stopped jumping (I wish I would have been rolling when that pinfish bounced off my bow).  Woods give way to marshes and the bay just opened up in front of us.  It’s been ten years since I first visited Apalachicola, for WFSU’s Our Town program.  I never thought I would enter it this way.  As we drove home over the bridge, in the last light of the day, I thought to myself “I can’t believe I just paddled that river.”

For more information on Rivertrek, visit the official page.  This page is on the Riverkeeper web site, and you can further explore what they do for the river.  (They’re also on Facebook).

The Franklin County Promise Coalition is coordinating aide efforts for families that are being affected in Franklin County through their Bay Aid program.   As Dan told us in his original interview, over half of the residents of Franklin County depend on the river for their livelihoods.  Learn more about volunteering and other Bay Aid opportunities here.