Tag Archives: Choctawhatchee Basin Alliance

GIC

Grasses in Classes: Kids Learn to Build a Salt Marsh

Rob Diaz de Villegas WFSU-TV

Last week, we took a good look at the coastal salt marsh- an ecosystem with a lot to offer but that is seeing die-off across the world. Around Choctawhatchee Bay, schoolchildren are doing something about this.

Two “spoonbills” fight for lima bean. Students at the Laurel Hill School did more than plant marsh cordgrass on the coast. At this station, they were given three types of tools to use as beaks: clothespins, spoons, and chopsticks. With those beaks, the “birds” had to forage for food. The exercise taught them about the adaptations that give animals different advantages. The best adapted beaks got the most food.

IGOR chip- sedimentation 150

Finding out about Grasses in Classes was one of the pleasant surprises of the year so far.  The Choctawhatchee Basin Alliance and AmeriCorps start with a similar premise to the In the Grass, On the Reef project: to foster appreciation for coastal ecosystems like oyster reefs, seagrass beds, and salt marshes.  We write and make videos for a general audience; Grasses in Classes goes into schools.  What they do goes beyond lesson plans and worksheets.  These kids grow smooth cordgrass (Spartina alterniflora), the foundation species of a coastal salt marsh, in their classrooms.  Then they go to Choctawhatchee Bay and plant it.  How awesome is that!  You can see in the video how much the cordgrass spreads out over the course of the year, a powerful visual affirmation to the Laurel Hill School students that what they’re doing is having an impact and will benefit that coastline for years to come.

A few yards from their marshes are restored oyster reefs like the ones CBA builds in the bay.  They’re frequent collaborators, the salt marsh and oyster reef.  Marshes, oyster reefs, and seagrass beds join to create an estuary of critical importance to Gulf fisheries, sheltering most seafood species fished there at some point in their life cycles. As was said in both this and the O.Y.S.T.E.R. Recycling video, marshes and oyster reefs fight erosion.  Marshes also filter stormwater runoff (check this list of everything that flows off of asphalt).  And yet, probably because no amount of horseradish makes Spartina grass palatable, marshes don’t always capture the popular imagination as oyster reefs do.  I hope we can change some of that in the coming weeks.

That’s where the CBA might have us beat.  Through their work, a generation of schoolchildren is getting that appreciation the wet and dirty way, by actively restoring that habitat where development had removed it.  And with the school year recently concluded, CBA and AmeriCorps are gearing up for next year by hiring 13 full time employees to continue to carry the program out.  Click here for more information.

Kayla Mitchell helps a Laurel Hill student plant a Spartina plant.  Spartina is the foundation species of a coastal salt marsh.

Kayla Mitchell helps a Laurel Hill student plant a Spartina plant.

OysterRecyclingBanner

Recycling Oyster Shells for Choctawhatchee Bay

Rob Diaz de Villegas WFSU-TV
Choctawhatchee Basin Alliance staff from L to R: Brandy Foley, Jeff Murphy, and Rachel Gwin listen as Allison McDowell explains how the reef is to be laid out.  She had previously laid the section visible under the water.

CBA staff from L to R: Brandy Foley, Jeff Murphy, and Rachel Gwin listen as Allison McDowell explains how the reef is to be laid out. She had previously laid the section visible under the water.

IGOR chip- sedimentation 150

I’ve been wanting to do a video on Choctawhatchee Basin Alliance‘s Oyster Recycling program for some time.  I decided to do it now because we’ve been covering restoration efforts in Apalachicola Bay, and while the two efforts appear to have similar goals, they’re both using different methods and aiming at different goals.  In Apalachicola, they’re trying to restore their fishery.  They want oyster spat to settle on their shells and grow into market sized (3 inches or more) adults.  In Choctawhatchee, they’re rebuilding their coastline.  It’s an ecosystem service we have mentioned in the past but have struggled to show, how oyster reefs (and salt marshes) prevent erosion.  You can see in the video above how the coastline is retreating and exposing tree roots where these natural barriers have been removed.  And you can see how the sand just accumulates where they’ve replaced shell.  It’s one of the many beautiful things an oyster reef does.

With 85% of the world’s oyster reefs having already been lost, and with more being threatened, restoration is critical.  Many of those efforts center around what’s left in your basket when you leave the raw bar.  Every part of the oyster is valuable.  The animal itself cleans the water and provides income for oyster harvesters.  But it’s also a builder, and an oyster reef provides shelter for various fish, crab, and snail species, many of which we eat.    The shells that make the reef are the best place for a larval oyster to land.  So those dozen or two shells you walk away from have their value as well.  Thankfully, people like the Choctawhatchee Basin Alliance staff and volunteers are doing the hard work of collecting them and putting them back to work for the reef.

This is a refrigerator at Busters in Santa Rosa Beach.  Donnie Sellers shucked 75 dozen oysters the day we were there, and that was before tourist season.  All of the restaurant's shells end up in blue recycle bins.

This is a refrigerator at Busters in Santa Rosa Beach. Standing behind the bar, Donnie Sellers shucked 75 dozen oysters the day we were there, and that was before tourist season. All of the restaurant’s shells end up in blue recycle bins.

Music in the Piece by Red Lion.

In the Grass, On the Reef is funded by a grant from the National Science Foundation.

Coastal Roundup August 17th – August 24th, 2012

Rebecca Wilkerson WFSU-TV

Choctawhatchee Basin Alliance Volunteer Opportunities
August 20th-August 23rd
Fort Walton Beach, FL
(850) 833-9927
For more information visit this Choctawhatchee Basin Alliance volunteer call.

Treasure Hunt Scallop Drop
Bay scallop in St. Joe Bay seagrass bedAugust 17th-September 10th
St. Joseph Bay, FL
(850) 229-7800

16th Annual MBARA Kingfish Tournament

August 25th
Mexico Beach, FL
For more information visit the MBARA tournament page.

“Sopchoppy Stop” Eco-Heritage Tour
P1000534August 25th
Sopchoppy, FL
(850) 926-3376
For more information visit the Sopchoppy Stop tour page.

Riverkeeper’s 4th Saturday Paddle
Apalachicola River at Bloody BluffAugust 25th
Apalachicola River, FL
(850) 653-8936
For more information visit the Apalachicola Riverkeeper site.

License-Free Saltwater Fishing Day
September 1st
Gulf of Mexico
For more information visit the Florida Fish and Wildlife page.

 

Lionfish

Lionfish 3For the next year, harvesting lionfish will no longer require a fishing license when using certain gear. The recreational and commercial bag limits have also been removed. These changes are effective through August 2013. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is hopeful that the changes will increase harvest opportunities of this nonnative invasive species in the Gulf of Mexico.  For more information on lionfish and the new harvest regulations view this FWC news release.

Lucky for us, these invasive lionfish are delicious. Give these Hot Lionfish Poppers a try after a long day of harvesting.

Crab Trap Closures

Derelict crab trap 3Blue crab trap closures began last week for Florida. These two 10-day trap closures give the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission the opportunity to identify and retrieve lost or abandoned traps that could become a problem for the marine environment. The scheduled closures vary by region. For more information on  the closures or the trap-retrieval program visit this FWC news release.

 Inspiring Adventures

Author Peter Heller sat down with Fresh Air host Terry Gross for an interview about his debut novel, The Dog Stars. An expedition kayaker, Heller explains how he draws inspiration through his often-dangerous adventures and how he relates his experiences to those of his characters. To learn more about Heller’s new novel and his paddling journeys, listen to the full interview on the NPR Books blog.

Safe Sun

Scientists from the University of Strathclyde are looking to put an end to outdoor clock-watching and blistered skin. They’ve created an ultraviolet-ray-detecting wristband that will give a visual warning that you’ve been in the sun long enough, using an acid detecting trigger that will turn the band from yellow to pink. Partners in the project are hopeful that the wristband will be available in spring 2013. Read more about the wristband, and the technology behind it, here.

On WFSU-TV

This Wednesday on WFSU-TV’s dimensions, viewers will be taken to various state parks in our viewing area. This one-tank-adventure will also bring us to Grayton Beach, near where producer Rob Diaz de Villegas shot a previous dimensions segment on the 2008 Back to Nature Festival.

In the Grass, On the Reef is funded by a grant from the National Science Foundation

P1000319

Coastal Roundup August 10th – August 17th, 2012

Rebecca Wilkerson WFSU-TV

Choctawhatchee Basin Alliance Volunteer Day – Oyster Reef Bagging
Oyster reefAugust 17th
Santa Rosa Beach, FL
(850) 200-4173
For more information and a list of volunteer opportunities visit the Choctawhatchee Basin Alliance volunteer page.

Treasure Hunt Scallop Drop
Bay scallop in St. Joe Bay seagrass bedAugust 17th- September 10th
St. Joseph Bay, FL
(850) 229-7800

16th Annual MBARA Kingfish Tournament
August 25th
Mexico Beach, FL
For more information visit the MBARA tournament page.

“Sopchoppy Stop” Eco-Heritage Tour
P1000534August 25th
Sopchoppy, FL
(850) 926-3376
For more information visit the Sopchoppy Stop tour page.

In the Kitchen

This week will mark the 100th birthday of Julia Child on August 15th. In celebration of the cooking legend, Marc Matsumoto uses Child’s Bouillabaisse to set the framework for a simple Seafood Stew using local ingredients. Learn more about his technique on the PBS Food Blog.

While we’re on the subject of local ingredients, check out how Gulf shrimp from Franklin County is used in this Buffalo Shrimp recipe.

On the East Coast

Near Dr. Hughes and Dr. Kimbro’s  St. Augustine research sites is the Fort Matanzas National monument. This National Park includes beach habitat that is crucial to several iconic Florida species. The National Park Service 2012 management plan has been drafted and some of the changes pose a risk to the wildlife here. The National Park Service will be hearing public input on the draft until August 24th. Visit this Audubon Florida news release for more information.

Clean Water Act

October will mark the 40th anniversary of the Clean Water Act. It is important to understand the importance of this piece of legislation, and to remember that there is still work that needs to be done. Visit this National Geographic News Watch article to read more about the Clean Water Act and its past, present, and future.

Apalachicola River

Apalachicola River at Bloody BluffOctober is also when the 2012 RiverTrek paddle is happening. This five-day  journey along the Apalachicola River helps raise awareness of the plight of the river system. RiverTrek also raises money for the Apalachicola Riverkeeper. For more information about RiverTrek , check out Doug Alderson’s Visit Tallahassee blog.

Summer Reading

If your summer reading was taken up by technical manuals, historical tales, or academic studies, you’re not alone. Although these aren’t the typical “beach books” we associate with summer lounging, many people use vacation time to catch up on the reading they’ve pushed aside throughout the year. Read more about which books are being packed for vacations on the NPR Books Blog.

In the Grass, On the Reef is funded by a grant from the National Science Foundation

P1000309

Coastal Roundup August 3rd – August 11th, 2012

We are just a couple of weeks away from our first new In the Grass, On the Reef videos.  This summer, mud crabs and stone crabs seem unusually abundant and are out on the reefs eating and giving us shots like we hadn’t had before.  Dolphins are liking to pass by when we shoot in Alligator Harbor, and Bay Mouth Bar is crawling with large horse conchs and other snails eating each other.  And just this week, we made it to Wakulla Beach for the first time, where the marshes are overstuffed with fiddler crabs and periwinkle snails.  And while it’s been a great summer for wildlife footage, we’ve also been hitting up seafood markets and restaurants and are starting to get up with more people who have a stake in our coastal ecosystems, where the land meets the sea.

Rebecca Wilkerson WFSU-TV

Oyster Appreciation

Alligator Harbor oyster reefAugust 5th is a day that is near and dear to our hearts, National Oyster Day. To add a feast to your celebration, put a twist on a traditional oyster dish by trying this Rockin’ Oyster Rockefeller recipe.

For those interested in getting more involved with oysters, the Choctawhatchee Basin Alliance will be holding an oyster reef bagging volunteer day on August 17th. Groups should register prior to that day if they plan on attending. Visit the Choctawhatchee Basin Alliance site for more information on volunteer opportunities.

Recreational Fishing

A few of the saltwater species that are currently in season include Bay Scallops, Greater Amberjack,  and Grouper. To view a complete list of species that are in season or for more information on regulations, visit the Florida Fish and Wildlife page on recreational saltwater fishing.

Helping out coastal critters

In addition to the Crawfordville location, Tallahassee’s LeMoyne Center for the Visual Arts is now a drop-off center for donations to the Florida Wild Mammal Association. For more information, including a list of non-perishable items that are needed, visit the Florida Wild Mammal Association website. (Photo copyright Florida Wild Mammal Association)

The Franklin County humane Society will be hosting the 15th Annual St. George Island Sizzler on August 11th. There will be a one mile fun run, a 5k race, plenty of food and a post-race party in the center of the island. Visit the St. George Island Sizzler site for more information. (Photo copyright St. George Island Sizzler)

Seagrass Wrack

seagrass wrack in cordgrassWrack, a phenomenon we’ve covered on this site before, is the dark green or brown grasses on the beach and is often mistaken for dried, dying seaweed. It is very much alive and is very important to the ecosystem. A few of the services wrack provides include bringing various organisms to the beach, feeding the birds, and aiding in the formation of sand dunes. Visit this Florida Fish and Wildlife article to find out more about the importance of wrack.

Silver Spring

Already compromised, Silver Springs is now the subject in a proposal that could bring greater harm to the once-magical Florida icon.  Visit this Audubon Florida opinion piece for more information about the current controversy surrounding the spring. To read about the changes that have already taken place in the Silver Springs water visit this Ocala opinion article.  (Photo copyright Audubon Florida)

Designer Shells for Hermit Crabs

Hermit crab in crown conch shell, next to crown conchsIn this area we’re used to seeing hermit crabs in lightning whelk and crown conch shells, like in the photo to the left. But now Robert DuGrenier, who has been blowing glass for over 30 years, is creating and selling custom glass shells for hermit crabs of all ages and sizes. Each shell is uniquely sculpted and can be colored or fused with precious metals for further customization. Learn more and check out some of the designs here.

Invasive Species

Nonnative LionfishAlthough lionfish are not native to the Gulf of Mexico, arriving around two years ago, the species has reached threateningly high numbers. With no natural predators, lionfish are taking over Florida’s reefs and eating juvenile fish. The invasive species could lead to a larger problem for the Gulf of Mexico’s ecosystem. Diving groups and hunting programs are being established in order to control the species. Listen to this WFSU-FM story for more information. (Photo copyright Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation)

Creating new habitats

The Mexico Beach Artificial Reef Association’s Memorial Reef Program lets loved one’s leave an underwater legacy that will last for hundreds of years. The reefs allow families to construct, personalize, and name a reef for their loved one, adding additions later if they wish. The reefs are an ecological way to do a cremation burial and create a permanent and sustainable ecosystem for marine life. For more information, visit the Mexico Beach Artificial Reef Association’s page on the Memorial Reef Program. Visit this article from The Star to read about personal experiences with the program.

In the Grass, On the Reef is funded by a grant from the National Science Foundation