Category Archives: Oyster Reef Ecology | On the Reef

Dr. David Kimbro studies predator-prey relationships in the oyster reefs and salt marshes of Florida’s Gulf coast.

Spat on a Platter

Tanya Rogers FSU Coastal & Marine Lab

IGOR chip_ predators_NCE 150“Spat tiles” are a tool our lab commonly uses to measure the growth and survivorship of juvenile oysters under different conditions, and we’ve used them with varying degrees of success in many of the experiments chronicled in this blog. What these are essentially (in their final form, after a good degree of troubleshooting), are little oysters glued to a tile, which is glued to a brick, which is glued to a mesh backing, which is zip tied vertically to a post. Rob and I have put together a couple interesting slideshows chronicling the growth of these spat over time from two of those experiments. Ever wonder how fast oysters grow? Observe…

This is a time series from our first spat tile experiment, which you can read about in this post. As you may recall, this experiment was largely a failure because the adhesive we used to adhere the spat was inadequate. However, we decided to keep the fully caged tiles out on the reefs to see how they fared over time in different locations. I photographed the tiles every 6 weeks or so, so that we now have a series showing their growth over time. The slideshow shows one of the tiles from Jacksonville. It starts in October of 2010. You’ll notice that not much growth occurs though the late fall and winter, but the spat start to grow noticeably from April-June 2011. From June-September the spat grow explosively and many new spat settle on the tile from the water column and grow equally rapidly. Just as plants (and algae) have a summer growing season, so too do the oysters that feed on them, when conditions are warm and there is abundant phytoplankton in the water to eat.

Next is a series of images from our caging experiment last summer, which you can read about here. Our large cages contained either:

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no predators (bivalves only),

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spat-consuming mud crabs and oyster drills (consumers),

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or mud crabs and oyster drills plus blue crabs and toadfish (predators).

The spat tiles within the larger cages were placed either exposed to potential predators or protected from them in a smaller subcage. Here are typical examples of what tiles looked like at the end of the experiment (about 2 months after starting). You can see how all the spat on the unprotected tiles were wiped out in the consumer treatments, but a good number survived in the treatments with no predators, as we would predict. In the predator treatments, most of the spat on unprotected tiles were removed, but not as fully or quickly as in the consumer treatments, which we would predict if the predators are inhibiting consumption of spat by the mud crabs and drills through consumptive or non-consumptive effects. You’ll see one tiny spat holding on in the predator tile shown. On the protected tiles, most of the spat survived in all treatments, as expected. We plan to further analyze the photographs from the protected tiles though, to see whether spat growth rates differed between them. We may find that protected spat in the consumer treatments grew slower than in the other treatments because of non-consumptive predator effects.

Currently, we’ve recovered most of our arsenal of spat tiles from the field, and I say we have probably amassed enough bricks to pave an entire driveway! Good thing we can reuse them!

The Biogeographic Oyster Study is funded by the National Science Foundation.

 

Tricks or Treats? And more on the effects of predators in marshes.

Dr. David Kimbro FSU Coastal & Marine Lab

IGOR chip_ predators_NCE 150Unlike most of the experiments that I’ve conducted up to this point in my career, the oyster experiment from this past summer does not contain a lot of data that can be analyzed quickly.

For example, predator effects on the survivorship of oysters can be quickly determined by simply counting the number of living as well as dead oysters and then by analyzing how survivorship changes across our 3 experimental treatments (i.e., cages with oysters only; cages with mudcrabs and oysters; cages with predators, mudcrabs, and oysters).  But this simple type of data tells us an incomplete story, because we are also interested in whether predators affected oyster filtration behavior and whether these behavioral effects led to differences in oyster traits (e.g., muscle mass) and ultimately the oyster’s influence on sediment characteristics.  If you recall, oyster filter-feeding and waste excretion can sometimes create sediment conditions that promote the removal of excess nitrogen from the system (i.e., denitrification)

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As we are currently learning, getting the latter type of data after the experiment involves multiple time-consuming and tedious steps such as measuring the length and weight of each oyster, shucking it, scooping out and weighing the muscle tissue, drying the muscle tissue for 48 hours, and re-weighing the muscle tissue (read more about this process here).

After repeating all of these steps for nearly 4,000 individual oysters, we can subtract the wet and dry tissue masses to assess whether oysters were generally:

(a) all shell…“Yikes! Lot’s of predators around so I’ll devote all of my energy into thickening my shell”

(b) all meat…“Smells relaxing here, so why bother thickening my shell”

(c) or a mix of the two.

For the next two months, I will resemble a kid with a full Halloween bag of candy who cannot wait to look inside his bag to see whether it’s full of tricks (nonsensical data) or some tasty treats (nice clean and interesting data patterns)!  I’ll happily share the answer with you as soon as we get all the data in order.

Because of this delay, let’s explore some new research of mine that examined how predators affect prey traits in local marshes and why it matters.

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There are two main ingredients to this story:

(a) tides (high versus low) dictate how often and how long predators like blue crabs visit marshes to feast on tasty prey.

(b) prey are not hapless victims; like you and me, they will avoid risky situations.

attach.msc1In Spartina alterniflora systems, periwinkle snails (prey) munch on dead plant material (detritus) lying on the ground or fungus growing on the Spartina leaves that hover over the ground.  Actually, according to Dr. B. Silliman at the University of Florida, these snails farm fungus by slicing open the Spartina leaves, which are then colonized by a fungal infection.  If snails fungal farm too much, then the plant will eventually become stressed and die.

So, I wondered if the fear of predators might control the intensity of this fungal farming and plant damage.

For instance, when the tide floods the marsh, snails race (pretty darn fast for a snail!) up plants to avoid the influx of hungry predators such as the blue crab.

After thinking about this image for a while, I wondered whether water full of predator cues might enhance fungal farming by causing the snail to remain away from the risky ground even during low tide.  Eventually, the snail would get hungry and need to eat, right?  Hence, my hypothesis about enhanced fungal farming due to predator cues.   I also wondered how much of this dynamic might depend on the schedule of the tide.

Before delving into how I answered these questions, you are probably wondering whether this nuance really matters in such a complicated world.  Fair enough, and so did I.

Addressing this doubt, I looked all around our coastline for any confirmatory signs and found that Spartina was less productive and had a lot more snail-farming scars along shorelines subjected to a diurnal tidal schedule (12 hours flood and 12 hours ebb each day) when compared to shorelines subjected to a mixed semidiurnal schedule (2 low tides interspersed among 2 high tides that are each 6 hours).  Even cooler, this pattern occurred despite there being equal numbers of snails and predators along both shorelines; obviously density or consumption effects are not driving this pattern.

Marsh_foodweb

Ok, with this observation, I felt more confident in carrying out a pretty crazy laboratory experiment to see if my hypothesis might provide an explanation.

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Enter Bobby Henderson.  This skilled wizard constructed a system that allowed me to manipulate tides within tanks and therefore mimic natural marsh systems; well, at least more so than does a system of buckets that ignore the tides.

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Within each row of tide (blue or red), I randomly assigned each tank a particular predator treatment.  These treatments allowed me to dictate not only whether predators were present but whether they could consume & frighten snails versus just frightening them:

-Spartina only

-Spartina and snails

-Spartina, snails, and crown conch (predator)

-Spartina, snails, blue crab (predator)

-Spartina, snails, crown conch and blue crab (multiple predators)

-Spartina, snails, cue of crown conch (non-lethal predator)

-Spartina, snails, cue of blue crab (non-lethal predator)

-Spartina, snails, cues of crown conch and blue crab (non-lethal multiple predators)

attach.msc6After a few weeks, I found out the following:

(1) Predators caused snails to ascend Spartina regardless of tide and predator identity.  In other words, any predator cue and tide did the job in terms of scaring the dickens out of snails.

(2) Regardless of tide, blue crabs ate a lot more snails than did the slow moving crown conch and together they ate even more.  This ain’t rocket science!

(3) In this refuge from the predators, snails in the diurnal tide wacked away at the marsh while snails in the mixed tide had no effect on the marsh.

diurnal-mixed_2box

Whoa…the tidal schedule totally dictated whether predator cues indirectly benefitted or harmed Spartina through their direct effects on snail predator-avoidance and farming behavior.  And, this matches the observations in nature… pretty cool story about how the same assemblage of predator and prey can dance to a different tune when put in a slightly different environment.  This study will soon be published in the journal Ecology.  But until its publication, you can check out a more formal summary of this study here.

If this sort of thing happens just along a relatively small portion of our coastline, I can’t wait to see what comes of our data from the oyster experiment, which was conducted over 1,000 km.

Till next time,

David

David’s research is funded by the National Science Foundation.

Scared hungry?

Dr. Randall Hughes FSU Coastal & Marine Lab

A hardhead catfish, one of a mud crab's primary predators on North Florida oyster reefs.

IGOR chip_ predators_NCE 150As David has mentioned previously, predators can affect their prey by eating them (a very large effect to the prey individual concerned!) or by changing their behavior. And exactly how the prey change their behavior can have large consequences for the things that they eat. For instance, if you’re out camping and hear a bear lumbering around, do you quickly pack up all your food and put it out of reach of the bear and yourself? Or do you quickly eat as much as you can?

This summer we worked with Kelly, an undergraduate from Bridgewater College, to document how mud crabs deal with this dilemma of getting enough to eat but not getting eaten themselves.

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Kelly with the broken down truck on an ill-fated return trip from St. Augustine.

Specifically, we wanted to know how they respond to the presence or absence of catfish, and how this response affects the survival of juvenile oysters. Sounds straightforward, right? Well, yes, in concept, but as Kelly quickly discovered, putting that “on paper” concept into reality at the lab took a lot of time and effort!

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First, she had to get the “mesocosms” (aka large tubs) ready to serve as adequate habitat for the crabs, with plenty of sand and dead oyster shell for them to hide in.

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Next, Kelly took individual juvenile oysters, or “spat”, and used a marine adhesive to attach them to small tiles that we could distribute among all of the mesocosms.

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Juvenile oysters attached with Zspar (a marine adhesive) to a tile so we could assess mud crab predation.

 

You may have noticed that I mentioned catfish, and that these mesocosms are not particularly large relative to the size of a catfish. Never fear – because we wanted to separate the effects of catfish cues from the effects of catfish actually eating mudcrabs, the catfish were kept in a much larger tank, and then water from this tank was pumped into the mesocosms receiving catfish cues. (Setting up the pump and tubing to 60+ tanks was a several-day effort in itself!)

Slide5

The catfish tank, with tubing carrying catfish "cues" to individual mesocosms.

Once everything was in place, it was time to collect the mud crabs. We couldn’t collect the crabs gradually, because they like to eat each other when confined in small spaces in the lab, so we garnered as much help as we could and held our own little mud crab rodeo. (And got caught in quite a thunderstorm in Alligator Harbor, but that’s another story).

Finally, it was time to start the experiment! We measured the size of each of the mud crabs, added them to the mesocosms, and let them eat (or not). Each day, Kelly would count the number of live oysters remaining, and she would remove a few mud crabs from some of the mesocosms to simulate catfish predation. There were a lot of moving parts to this experiment, and Kelly did a great job managing it!

And what did we find? Turns out that individual mud crabs actually eat more juvenile oysters when they are exposed to catfish cues and the removal / disappearance of some of their neighboring mud crabs, compared to just the removal of neighboring mud crabs or the absence of catfish cues. But overall, the the removal of mud crabs have a positive effect on oyster survival. (Even though individual crabs may eat more, there are not as many crabs around, so it’s a net positive for oysters.)

Slide1

Mud crabs ate more oysters per individual in buckets with exposure to catfish cues and high rates of manual removal of mud crabs (to simulate predation).

Kelly has returned to classes, so we’ve now recruited a new assistant, Meagan, to help us with an experiment to address the additional questions that inevitably arise as you learn more about a system – for example, do mud crabs behave differently if catfish are around all the time versus only some of the time? We’ll keep you posted…

Randall and David’s research is funded by the National Science Foundation.

Switching gears: from kayak to office cubicle

Hanna Garland FSU Coastal & Marine Lab

IGOR chip_ predators_NCE 150As fast as summer approached, it is now over; and for myself, it marks the closing of an intense field season and the beginning of my first year as a graduate student. However, this does not mean that the experiments, laboratory work, and data collection is put on hold. There is still plenty of work to check off the “to do” list that seems to never get any shorter.

My last post introduced the scientific question I was hoping to answer and the reason for studying the relationship between crown conchs and oysters in the Matanzas River as opposed to a different location. While I did not answer the question entirely (that would be far too difficult to accomplish in one summer), I was able to establish a strong, preliminary data set that I can now analyze and re-configure in order to improve upon this research next season.

Similar to methods described in David and Tanya’s posts, the construction of my experiment consisted of (much smaller) trenches dug for cage installation, Z-spar for attaching oyster spat to tiles, bumblebee bee tagging kits for marking appropriately weighed and measured oyster clusters, and various amounts of PVC for expensive data logger equipment housing. The fun meter never stopped ticking this summer in St. Augustine!

As I sit in my cubicle in my new office on campus, my mind cannot help but wander back to my life this summer driven by the time of low tide and whether I would have enough sunlight or energy to kayak out to one more site. To my surprise, the running of my experiment was manageable and actually became a relaxing routine. Data collection was divided into three categories: conch surveys, oyster health, and data logger maintenance. The number of conchs found on the experimental reefs was recorded in order to quantify the varying densities of these predators at each site. The health of the small oysters attached to tiles as well as the tagged larger clusters were assessed based on the number of live and dead. The data logging instruments record the water temperature, salinity and amount of tidal inundation occurring at each of my six experimental oyster reefs every five minutes (so there are a lot of data points to be analyzed here!) and require periodic scrubbing to remove algal and barnacle growth.

While the daily workload may seem light as far as stress levels; the fine print of every step of an experiment can be a tremendous mix of emotions. The hope for not just data but “good” data is something that all scientists share; however, this does not mean that conducting research needs to be filled with anxiety. The outlook that I aimed to have this summer was more based on the feelings of excitement and opportunity rather than high expectations that may or may not be met. To be able to conduct this study in such an ecologically rich environment surrounded by intelligent, supportive, and proactive people and institutions is an accomplishment in itself.

While my data set still requires endless hours of manipulation and analysis, the general outcome of my experiment this summer revealed that there is in fact an oyster health gradient occurring along the Matanzas River, with a change in health occurring around the Matanzas Inlet. In tandem with this increasing oyster mortality moving from my sites north of the inlet to the sites south; are high densities of crown conch populations on the southern reefs, with a decrease in these populations moving towards reefs north of the inlet. Furthermore, environmental factors (water temperature, salinity and tidal inundation data collected by my instruments) will be considered when looking at these patterns.

As a way to better quantify the health and size of the oyster community as well as the density of the resident species (such as crabs, worms, and other amphipods) that inhabit oyster reefs; I surveyed and sampled background reefs at each of my six experimental sites. Long story short, this meant that I randomly selected four new oyster reefs at each site in which I collected environmental data and basic reef characteristics (type of reef, location, dimensions), conducted conch surveys, and collected every living oyster cluster, dead shell, crab, piece of biota, etc. inside of a 0.25 x 0.25 meter quadrat. After washing away the mud, extracting the living organisms and preserving them in ethanol, and weighing, measuring, and recording each live and dead oyster, I have developed a solid database of the oyster reef communities at each of my sites. This will help to better describe the type and abundance of species present at each site.

Oyster reef communities impact us in more ways than providing a tasty appetizer at a restaurant. Not only do they provide a habitat for commercially and ecologically important species, but they also serve to locally improve water quality and prevent erosion. Oyster reefs are complex communities that are in a state of decline along the Florida coast. Unfortunately, unhealthy oysters cause unhealthy or collapsed resident species communities because these organisms depend on oyster reef habitats for food, shelter, and other important aspects of their life cycle. This experiment and preliminary data set provides insight to changing food web dynamics occurring not only along the Matanzas River but in all oyster reef communities.

Apalachicola oysters

Tasty as they are, oysters have a far greater ecological- and economical- value when they're alive in their oyster reefs.

Whether you are enjoying seafood for dinner or driving on a bridge over estuarine environments, keep in mind the important role each individual species plays in a larger community structure. Our actions upstream of these fragile habitats impact everything from microscopic worms to the maturing oyster spat and larger fish populations. As my project evolves, I hope to not only strengthen the scientific community but also raise awareness among people who unknowingly influence an aspect of oyster reef habitats.

 

20110901-071441.jpgHey y’all

Started things back up on Monday. The winds have turned two day job into four days, but we finally finished site harvesting reefs today. Now must be good scientists by cleaning up after ourselves. Then, lots of samples to work through at lab.

Photo of cages minus reef. Feel like a pig in mud lately.

Best,
David

Summer Chaos and The Tower of Cards

Throughout this week, Dr. David Kimbro has been updating us about the premature dismantling of his lab’s summer experiment in preparation for Hurricane Irene.   Before this turn of events, David’s lab tech, Tanya Rogers, had written this account detailing how much work went into assembling the experiment and all of its (literally) moving parts.

Tanya Rogers FSU Coastal & Marine Lab

Beautiful, isn't it? But working on oyster reefs in Jacksonville hasn't been as nice as its sunrises.

IGOR chip- employment 150

For many labs, the summer field season is a period of intensity and madness: a time for tackling far too many projects and cramming as much research as possible into a preciously short window. It’s a demanding flurry of activity occasionally bordering on chaos. The greatest challenge for technicians like myself is to maintain order in this pandemonium of science, and to carry out as much field work as efficiently as possible without going crazy.

Continue reading

20110824-080052.jpgHowdy.

The tide normally doesn’t look this high. This means that Irene is causing the water level to surge and will probably prevent a good low tide tomorrow.

So, we accomplished 1/2 of our goals and must now wait for Irene to clear out before cranking up the break down machine again.

But from a cursory inspection of our samples, I can already see some very interesting results. More later.

Best,
David

Hurricane Irene and the Cage Experiment

Rob Diaz de Villegas WFSU-TV

For a few months now, we’ve been telling you about an extensive field experiment being conducted for the biogeographic oyster study. As David posted earlier, it was a complex undertaking that took a lot of hard work- long hours and physical labor- to get up and running.  Now, thanks to Hurricane Irene, they have to tear down about a month ahead of time.  While it no longer looks likely to hit David’s St. Augustine site, it might hit some of the other team’s sites in the Carolinas (or at least bring heavy rain).  In order for the data to be consistent, once one site starts tearing down, they all do.  That’s the challenge of conducting a study where you look at effects over a large geographic expanse- staying consistent when so many things can vary across the miles.  Even the manner in which the cages are taken down is important; all of the Primary Investigators (the team leaders) were to have met in Skidaway, Georgia next month to decide how to proceed on that front.  Now, they’ll have to figure it out on the fly.

David will be updating us on the progress of the experiment tear down as it happens, so stay tuned!

David’s research is funded by the National Science Foundation.

20110824-090030.jpgHey y’all

Waiting for the tide to drop so that we can get started this morning. Maybe a few more crossed fingers will give us a better tide today!

Thank goodness we are out of the path of Irene. But we must continue with breakdown because the ball is already in motion for all our teams on the east coast.

Will check in with y’all later.

David

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My favorite part of an experiment: getting to see how treatments affected your samples.

Team NC closed one whole site today while Team GA is struggling with poor tides. Team Fl is only 1/2 finished with one site because of poor tides. Hope a switch in the wind tomorrow will improve the tide.

Ok, on to the third coffee of the day!

David