All posts by Rob Diaz de Villegas

About Rob Diaz de Villegas

Rob Diaz de Villegas is a senior producer for WFSU-TV, covering environment and the outdoors. Rob is in the process of completing Roaming the Red Hills, an exploration of north Florida/ south Georgia ecology funded by Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy. Rob’s previous ecology projects include EcoShakespeare, which was funded by PBS member station WNET and the National Endowment for the Humanities, and In the Grass, On the Reef, a collaboration with the Florida State University Coastal and Marine Lab funded by the National Science Foundation. Rob’s EcoAdventure segments air on WFSU’s Local Routes and can be found on the WFSU Ecology Blog.

This is Science, Too

Kimbro board

Rob Diaz de Villegas WFSU-TV

IGOR chip- employment 150After a cold, wet field day in St. Joe Bay with Randall Hughes and her crew, I stopped by the FSU Coastal and Marine Lab to hose off and return some waders they had lent us.  While there I decided to stop and say hi to David Kimbro and saw this dry erase board on his wall.  For some reason, it made me think of the first post I wrote for this blog.  In that post, and in a good majority of our posts and videos since, we showed and talked about the down and dirty side of science- field work in muddy places.  Early morning kayaking, pulling half-eaten fish out of gill nets, vacuuming bugs out of cordgrass– it makes for good video.

But that isn’t all of it, of course.  I said in that first post that science isn’t all test tubes and lab coats.  But lo and behold, Randall and David do have labs where their samples are processed, and they do have lab equipment and run experiments in controlled environments.  We have shown some of that as well.  And there is quite a bit of work they do at desks on computers, on paper, or up on their dry-erase boards.  I haven’t shot and edited that video yet.  But it’s worth some examination.

Snail experiment: periwinkles on juncus

This experiment measured the impact of periwinkle snails on the grasses they climb. Some cages had cordgrass, some (like this one) had needlerush, and others had a combination of the two. Control cages had grass with no snails.

Moving clockwise from the upper right of that board you have a diagram showing tides at Baymouth Bar, for a project we’ll be covering sometime soon.  There are also some equations that David and Tanya have been working on.  The speckled circles represent different cages or tanks for an experiment in the process of being planned.  Randall and David often conduct experiments where multiple tubs and cages have variations of different factors (i.e. some have short grass, some have long grass, some have a combination of grasses, etc.  The snail experiment is a good example).  The oval with the squares in it represents Baymouth Bar, split into regions.  The triangle is a rough sketch of a food web, and the numbers in the upper left are grant numbers.

David said he’s afraid to erase anything on the board, even though he snapped a photo of it (and I’ve now immortalized it online).  These are ideas waiting to be actualized.  The little circles will become tubs full of predatory snails.  Activities planned for low and high tide will be carried out, and theories tested.  And so, like cutting crabs out of a shark’s belly, or counting how much grass is in a quadrat, this is science.

David and Randall’s research is funded by the National Science Foundation.

Day 7: October Oyster Push- Last Day

Rob Diaz de Villegas WFSU-TV

Thursday, October 28- Finish up, head back home

P1020010

(Farthest to nearest) Hanna, Tanya, and Cristina perform some of the more glamorous work of this trip- cracking oysters apart and finding spat (oyster babies). David needed everyone on his team to perform, or this week would be wasted.

IGOR chip- biogeographic 150A while back, I was talking to Randall or David, I forget which one, and they were telling me about building a research crew.  Obviously you need people who have the knowledge and skills to do what needs to be done- from identifying fish to driving a boat, or setting a gill net.  But just as important, they said, was that you had people you could get along with, since you practically live with them sometimes.

Weeks like this one are where building the team pays off.  When you’re getting bitten up by gnats on an oyster reef at 6:45 in the morning, you don’t want a crew member sniping at another about losing a fish out of the gill net.  David remarked to me that the morale of this team had stayed strong, despite the schedule always changing and everyone having to shoulder more of the load while David got the tiles ready.  They did a lot of work on their own, and made it possible to get everything done even as plans shifted.

On a day like today, it was good that David has the crew he has.

P1010953

A swarm of gnats hovers over the oyster reef water.

6:45 AM– Retrieved fish from nets, deployed traps.

After a night of battling cockroaches in their “haunted” house, they might have been happier to be out on oyster reefs at this early hour.  They might have, had it not been for the no see-ums.  They were getting eaten alive, which made it hard to work.  And it got worse from there, as if the universe decided to pile it on in this last day.

As early as it was, the birds had gotten to their fish before they did and there were no stomachs to examine.  And then there were the injuries.  David cut his finger on a catfish spine, and then, within about ten minutes, a stone crab got a hold of Hanna’s finger and inflicted some pain.  They’re both okay.  Their truck, however, is a little worse off.

Truck accident in Jacksonville

Banged up over the course of the week, the crew- and their truck- are ready to come home.

When they got back, they glued spat onto tiles one more time to deploy this afternoon.

3:00 PM– Tanya, Hanna, and Cristina retrieved the traps and set the tiles.

7:00 PM– The girls headed back to the FSU Coastal & Marine Lab.  When they got there, they cleaned all of their gear, even though it was late.  They figured that it was better to wash the salt off sooner than later.

So that was the week.  They’ll go back to each of the sites about every six weeks, though it won’t always be this intensive.  David, Jeb (SC/ GA), and Jon (NC) will start to see seasonal patterns in the fish that they find- when do certain fish tend to show up on what reef?  They’ll check in on their tiles and take photos, and over the months the photos should play like a flip book in showing the growth of the oysters on each site.  They’ll gain understanding, and they’ll run into more road blocks.  They have about two-and-a-half years left on this study, so while Thursday was the last day of the push, they’re nowhere near the end of the road.

P1010964

Assuming no one tampers with them, we should be able to watch these oysters grow up over the next year.

Check back in a couple of weeks for wrap-up posts from David and Tanya.

Tide Times and height (ft.) for Jacksonville, October 28, 2010
Low- 6:44 AM (0.3)

David’s research is funded by the National Science Foundation.

We’d love to hear from you! Leave your comments and questions below:

Day 6: October Oyster Push- Home Stretch

Rob Diaz de Villegas WFSU-TV

Wednesday, October 27- Finish tiles, go to Jacksonville

P1020009

When not losing sleep over whether the tile experiment will work, David dreams of making the tiles. They'll be back in six weeks to check on the progress of the baby oysters they set upon the reefs.

IGOR chip- biogeographic 150Walking down the hall of our dorm at 7 AM, I heard the familiar sound of the dremel from across the street in the lab area.  This time the whole crew was there- Tanya, Hanna, and Cristina cleaning and separating oysters and David Kimbro slicing shells into similarly sized pieces.  The Jacksonville oysters they’re processing have an entirely different kind of predator than the Marineland oysters have in crown conchs.  The Jax shells were speckled with little greenish spots- these are boring sponges.  They bore holes through the shell and take up residence within it.  The specks were making it harder to spot spat.

I was thinking about predators when I was driving today, in particular the crown conchs here.  A1A runs alongside the intercoastal waterway where the oyster reefs are.  Driving north towards the Matanzas Inlet, which is the northern boundary of the crown conch problem, there is a bridge under construction.  While getting some footage of oyster reefs earlier, I noticed how close many of the reefs are to the road and its runoff.  Overall, the area is more heavily settled than the Forgotten Coast sites where David and Randall do their studies.  This drive I took today put a slightly different light on the work they do.  When I’m shooting on the reefs, or in the salt marshes, it sometimes seem like a different world.  But it isn’t, really.  Not that this sudden and very focused problem may not have an entirely natural cause.  But there are a lot of potential factors in play outside of trophic cascades and water salinity.

P1020005

Those innocuous looking spots are trying to kill the oyster and take over its shell.

2:00 PM– Hanna, and Cristina drove to Jacksonville to deploy nets at low tide.  Cristina found a deep spot in the mud and sank in waist deep, which is a concern at this site.  The new boat was purchased specifically for this site, as it’s a long kayak trip in somewhat treacherous waters.

P1010983

So far, so good for the Saint Augustine spat tiles.

4:30 PM– David and Tanya finish making the Jacksonville tiles and spend about two hours cleaning up the lab space.  Tanya kayaked out to check on the St. Augustine tiles they deployed yesterday before heading to Jax.  David said he had lost sleep last night over whether the tiles would still be there, or if the glue would even hold the spat onto the tile.  Jon Grabowski (NC team leader) has a site with easy public access.  This morning he showed up to find his sites being harvested, the tiles already removed.  So you can see where David would worry.  But, at least over the first night, the SA tiles were fine.

David and Tanya joined the rest of the team in Jacksonville for another awesome Tanya-cooked meal.  I feel I did her a disservice yesterday by not mentioning the zucchini bread and double chocolate biscotti she made, so I’ll do so now.  Yum!  Perhaps On the Reef needs a cooking segment.  Everyone is now settled into a house they all think is haunted.  Hanna put together a makeshift tub on their screened-in porch to keep the spat alive to deploy tomorrow.  One more day to go…

P1010893

On Thursday, the October oyster push concludes and the FL, GA/ SC, and NC teams will start looking at the data and continue establishing patterns.

Tide Times and height (ft.) for Jacksonville, October 27, 2010
Low- 5:56 AM (0.2)
High- 12:25 PM (5.7)
Low- 6:42 PM (0.5)

David’s research is funded by the National Science Foundation.

We’d love to hear from you! Leave your comments and questions below:

Day 5: October Oyster Push- A Change of Plans

Rob Diaz de Villegas WFSU-TV

Tuesday, October 26- Tile Team heads to Jacksonville

P1010798_1

The whirring sound, the smell of calcium carbonate dust, the warmth of his face behind the mask and goggles- this is the stuff of David Kimbro's dreams.

IGOR chip- biogeographic 150The WFSU crew stayed the night in St. Augustine to accompany both the Net/ Fish and Tile teams when they headed out at sunrise.  After breakfast, I went out to the lab space (we’re all staying at a research facility very near the reefs they study), and David Kimbro was there, before the sun had made its way out, separating shards of shell with spat on them.  He’d missed all of the field work here up to that point so that this experiment could work.  Until this afternoon, it was all I had seen him do here.  If he was able to focus in on this one aspect of this large an undertaking, it is because Hanna and Tanya have been able to operate independently and pick up the slack.  By the time he actually made it into the field, David followed Tanya’s lead.

Also working hard on this trip are my poor sneakers.  I have an old pair that I designated for my work on this project, shoes I knew I would never wear for anything else.  The reefs in Cedar Key and St. Augustine have torn them up.  I keep stepping in soft mud that hides oysters, or stray clumps cloaked by muddy water.  It might be time to invest in boots.

P1010870_1

There's nothing like the smell of dead fish in the morning.

7:30 AM– Hanna, Tanya, and Cristina went out to retrieve the catch from the gill nets, take sediment samples, retrieve the data loggers, and take some fish stomachs (how else would you know what the predators were eating?).  They also replaced the spat sticks, which were still only attracting barnacles.  Tanya noticed, however, that spat would settle on the rebar below the stick.

A couple of Environmental Scientists from the St. Johns River Water Management System agency kayaked up at some point to watch the proceedings.  They are working with David’s lab to determine why these once commercially viable reefs were overrun and depleted by crown conchs.  The problem seems to be very localized, occurring between Ponce Inlet in New Smyrna Beach and Matanzas Inlet.  David is hoping for more “spinoff projects” like this one, in which he and his lab can use applied science to help specific reef systems.

And while we’re on the topic of predatory snails, Here’s that pic of the Atlantic Oyster Drill:

P1010905_1

Crown conch, tulip snails, and oyster drills heavily populate these Marineland, FL reefs.

2:30 PM– Hanna and Cristina headed to Jacksonville to begin removing clumps of reef with Jacksonville spat on them. But first they were to inspect the house they were renting to see if there was a suitable area to make their Jacksonville spat tiles. That process involves keeping oysters in large tubs of water, prying shells off of the clump, and using a dremel to make the pieces somewhat uniform in size. If I was renting someone a house, I wouldn’t want them doing that in my bathroom. Hanna determined that the house did not have a workable area, causing a shift in their plans. Hanna and Cristina now had to bring the reef segments back to St. Augustine to process. Instead of deploying nets in Jacksonville Wednesday morning, they’ll have to do this in the afternoon after processing the spat all day. And instead of finishing with Jacksonville on Thursday morning, they’ll be there all day (causing David to make his three hour drive home at night).

5:00 PM– David and Tanya retrieve the small fish traps.  A couple of the fish they catch are pretty colorful, I suspect they’re something that once lived in a saltwater aquarium.  They also deployed the tiles into which so much effort had been expended.  It’s a major part of this study, and David is happy to get started on it just five months after that first day in Alligator Harbor.  And it’s still early enough in this three year study that they can tweak the experiment and try it again next year (experiments of this nature don’t always work the first time).

After all the work was done, Tanya made a tasty four-bean vegetarian chili, and everyone enjoyed a relaxed dinner before convening again at 7:30 AM to process more spat.

P1010994_1

David finally makes it out into the field.

Tide Times and height (ft.) for Saint Augustine, October 26, 2010
Low- 8:oo AM (0.3)
High- 2:17 PM (5.2)
Low- 8:41 PM (0.7)
Tide Times and height (ft.) for Jacksonville, October 25, 2010
High- 5:56 PM (0.5)
We’d love to hear from you! Leave your comments and questions below:

Day 4: October Oyster Push “Sweet Boat”

Rob Diaz de Villegas WFSU-TV
David Kimbro’s crew has been split into two teams, the Net/Trap team (N/T) and the Tile team (TI). For a closer look at how David’s team nets and traps larger fish and crabs, click here. To learn more about what the Tile team will be doing, click here. And if you click On the Reef under categories in the sidebar, you can track David’s progress over the course of this study.

Monday, October 25- Both teams in Saint Augustine

P1010782_1

That grey spot (dead center) on the shell is spat. After landing on existing shells, they'll build their own and expand the clump.

IGOR chip- biogeographic 150When I got to St. Augustine, David was chiseling out shards of shell containing oyster spat (baby oysters) from clumps so that he could glue them onto tiles, as he described in Friday’s post.  I got a good look at what spat actually was.  You can see it in the photo here, basically a small oyster with no shell, seeking out a hard surface (often another oyster’s shell) upon which to settle.  David stayed behind doing that as the rest of his crew, and our crew, piled into the boat for this evening’s activities.

This new experiment- placing tiles with the same number of oyster recruits at all sites on every reef across the study- will give them a more precise picture of how young oysters survive at each site.  It also means a lot of extra work, as the spat that goes on the tiles has to be from the specific location to be entirely accurate- spat is harvested one day, immediately chiseled off and made into tiles and placed on the reef, in the span of about two days.  And this is in addition to the other sampling and trapping.  The previous tile method worked fairly well for the NC and SC/GA teams, but for the sake of being consistent, they’ve also had to adapt this method (while cursing David Kimbro’s name).

P1010846_1

Crown conchs in St. Augustine making a snack of an oyster.

As previously noted on this blog, the reefs did have plenty of crown conchs crawling on them.  David and Tanya have also started noticing Atlantic Oyster Drills, a smaller snail we don’t see in the Gulf.  I’ll look for some tomorrow and get a photo or two up.

8:00 AM– Hanna and Randall (N/T team) retrieved the nets that they set last night in Cedar Key.  This is low tide work, as that’s when it’s best to empty the nets.  They got to their first reef after the vultures did, losing a bit of their catch but still able to identify some species from the fish heads left behind.

1:00 PM– Hanna headed to Saint Augustine and Randall headed home.  As Hanna was gassing up the truck and boat, an elderly gentlemen circled the boat, in awe of David’s creation.  Eventually, he said, “sweet boat.”

P1010640

A sweet boat.

5:00 PM– Deploy nets, take water samples, and reference water level.  The two teams combined activities that would have kept them out past dark, and finished just as the sun was setting.  They then helped David glue spat onto tiles for another hour or so before heading out to dinner.

P1010861_1

That was the day.  As you see, field work involves a lot of rethinking (as in the tile experiment), thinking on your feet, dealing with circumstances (vultures eating your catch), and coming up with unusual solutions (refitting your boat in a way some might find strange).  It’s pretty late now (as I type this, even though I plan to post this in the morning).  Time to head to bed so that I can get up and shoot that sunrise.

Tide Times and height (ft.) for Cedar Key, October 24, 2010
Low- 10:oo AM (-0.3)
Tide Times and height (ft.) for Saint Augustine, October 25, 2010
High- 1:35 PM (5.3)
Low- 8:41 PM (0.6)

We’d love to hear from you! Leave your comments and questions below:

Day 3: October Oyster Push “No Nap Time”

Rob Diaz de Villegas WFSU-TV
David Kimbro’s crew has been split into two teams, the Net/Trap team (N/T) and the Tile team (TI). For a closer look at how David’s team nets and traps larger fish and crabs, click here. To learn more about what the Tile team will be doing, click here. And if you click On the Reef under categories in the sidebar, you can track David’s progress over the course of this study.

Sunday, October 24- Net / Trap team in Cedar Key

Randall places traps on a Cedar Key reef

Randall places traps on a Cedar Key reef.

IGOR chip- biogeographic 150After months of walking around In the Grass, Dr. Randall Hughes stepped out On the Reef Sunday, pitching in for some fieldwork with David’s tech, Hanna Garland. They were the Net / Trap team working Cedar Key, while Tanya Rogers is heading up the Tile team in Saint Augustine. Randall, in addition to heading the salt marsh biodiversity study we also follow on this blog, is the co-PI (Primary Investigator) on this biogeographic oyster study. With her other study taking so much of her time and David having things well in hand with this one, she hadn’t made it out into the field until Sunday.  We tagged along with her today.

This was our first time documenting this study outside of Alligator Harbor (which is located a short hour from WFSU-TV) and, actually, it was my first time on any oyster reef other than those. I noticed that the water was a little clearer- I could actually see some of the oyster clumps for a foot or so under water as opposed to not at all. Few of the oyster reefs were as large as in AH, tending more often than not to stay a collection of clumps than an expansive reef. There were also stretches where reefs had been, and all that remained were broken shells. Randall told me that these had either been harvested or that the reefs had just plain failed (Tanya recounted finding two of the Cedar Key reefs obliterated in her last post).

P1010735

Scientific equipment being used in an entirely lawful way. This machine filters the sediment floating in the water- including the phytoplankton that oysters eat.

If you take a look at the schedule below, you can see that the events are spread out based on the tide schedule; and there are a couple of days during this push where they start around sunrise and work well into the night. So there are breaks from fieldwork built into the day. I had assumed that this would be “nap time.” To my surprise, this is actually “lab time.” The water samples they had taken on our boat ride had to be filtered, and the filters frozen as fast as possible to prevent bacteria from contaminating them. They set up their “lab” in the kitchen of a condo they were renting. The apparatus they use is a collection of PVC pipes, tubing, and a motor into which they pour the liquid from clear test tubes. Randall had seen a news story this last week where some college kids were arrested for turning their dorm room into a crystal meth lab. She wondered aloud whether someone looking in their window might suspect the same of her and Hanna.

8:00 AM– Travel to Cedar Key

P1010489

Boating from reef to reef, we would see places like this where a reef had been decimated. Two of the original Cedar Key sites for this study were destroyed. These are the kinds of things that happen outside of the controlled environment of a laboratory.

12:23 PM– Deploy traps, collect spat sticks, water samples. They once again made use of the new boat, though the public boat ramp is on the other side of the island from where their sites are located. They were going to look for a boat ramp closer to their sites to save a little more time.

The spat sticks so far have only collected barnacles at all of their sites, meaning that they may have started using them past the season in which oysters spawn.

6:00 PM– Retrieve traps, High tide activities: reference water level, replace spat sticks (if possible).

9:00 PM– Deploy nets. Randall and Hanna will retrieve these in the morning before Hanna heads to Saint Augustine to meet up with David Kimbro and the rest of the crew.

Tide Times and height (ft.) for Cedar Key, October 24, 2010
Low- 9:23 AM (-0.3)
High- 3:48 PM (3.3)
Low- 9:13 PM (1.4)

Sunday, October 24- Tile team in Saint Augustine

1:00 PM– Tanya Rogers and new crew member Cristina drive to Saint Augustine.

7:00 PM– Retrieve tiles/oysters.

Tide Times and height (ft.) for Saint Augustine, October 24, 2010
Low- 7:21 PM (0.5)
We’d love to hear from you! Leave your comments and questions below:

Days 1 & 2: October Oyster Push- “Just Gun it”

Rob Diaz de Villegas WFSU-TV
Alligator Harbor at sunrise

The sun is about to rise in Alligator Harbor.

IGOR chip- biogeographic 150The first leg of David Kimbro’s Roctober oyster push is now complete.  If you look at the schedule below, you’ll see the first day was intensive, starting in the wee hours and going late into the night.  As David mentioned in his post, the head of the NC team (Jon Grabowski) was along for the fun.  David was Jon’s lab tech once upon a time, as was Dr. Randall Hughes (In the Grass).  So tagging along I definitely got some “family reunion” vibes, with lots of good natured ribbing (let’s just say it was good-natured).

For this October push, David will be breaking in a new boat to help his team cover ground more efficiently while lugging traps and samples around.  In order for the boat to move in shallow water, David replaced the motor with a lawnmower engine.  It worked fine on Thursday, when the water was higher, but it had a few problems Friday morning at low tide:

Jon drags the boat- and Tanya and Alicia

Jon Grabowski drags the boat- along with and Tanya and Alicia- after not being able to drive the boat through shallow waters.

Finally, they were able to get it to go.  The solution?  As David’s tech, Hanna, said- “Just Gun it!”

The catch this time was a little different than the last, with new fish like Red Drum ending up in the gill nets and no juvenile fish being caught in the minnow traps.  They also started looking into the stomachs of some of the predators (they have a permit to do so if the fish die in the net) and are seeing that the catfish here are eating mud crabs.  Mud crabs, of course, are key oyster predators.

Hanna kayaks

Early Friday morning, Hanna Garland kayaks to "site 1" in Alligator Harbor.

We’ll be heading out with David’s crew throughout the week.  On top of all of the other arrangements they have to make to move their crews around multiple sites hundreds of miles apart, they have to accommodate our camera crew.  So thanks for finding a way to drag us along!  Hopefully we can show people the kind of work that goes into making this kind of research happen.  There’s a lot of work to go along with the science, and with every subsequent sweep and new experiment, the patterns will hopefully clarify and our understanding of these ecosystems- and how to best conserve them- will be that much further advanced.

David’s crew has been split into two teams, the Net/Trap team (N/T) and the Tile team (TI).  For a closer look at how David’s team nets and traps larger fish and crabs, click here.  To learn more about what the Tile team will be doing, click here.  And if you click On the Reef under categories in the sidebar, you can track David’s progress over the course of this study.

Thursday, October 21-  Alligator Harbor

8:30 AM– Retrieve tiles, sediment, and spat. (TI)

11:07 AM– Deploy traps (N/T)

5:07 PM– Retrieve traps.  High tide activities: reference water level, water samples, replace spat sticks.  Unlike in the previous sampling done in Alligator Harbor, there were no juvenile pinfish or pigfish.(N/T)

8:00 PM– Deploy nets.  The nets will be retrieved Friday morning to give David an idea about what was swimming around over night.  (N/T)

Tide Times and height (ft.) for Alligator Harbor, October 21, 2010
Low-  8:07 AM (0.2)
High- 2:12 PM (2.7)
Low- 8:07 PM (0.9)

P1010300Friday, October 22-  Alligator Harbor

8:00 AM– Retrieve nets, data logger.  Today there were a lot of red drum (redfish) and of course, catfish (hardhead and sail).  On site dissection reveals that the catfish eat mud crabs, thus serving the same role that toadfish serve in North Carolina reefs. (N/T)

8:30 AM– Return tiles/ oysters.  The tiles for the new spat experiment mentioned by David go out today. (TI)

Tide Times and height (ft.) for Alligator Harbor, October 21, 2010
Low-  8:40 AM (0.1)

David and his team are taking Saturday off.  Bright and early Sunday morning, the Net/ Trap team heads for Cedar Key while the Tile team heads to Saint Augustine.

David’s research is funded by the National Science Foundation.
We’d love to hear from you!  Leave your comments and questions below:

The Making of a Softshell Crab

Rob Diaz de Villegas WFSU-TV

IGOR chip- habitat 150To clarify, we are looking at the biological process through which a blue crab molts its shell, not recipes (feel free though, to share your favorites in the comments area).  I have to admit that before I started this project, I had thought that softshell crabs were a specific species, or group of species.  Of course, such a species wouldn’t survive very well in the wild. Continue reading

A walk “in the grass”

Rob Diaz de Villegas WFSU-TV

P1000030

Last week we had a post on what it was like on an oyster reef, the idea being that many people have never really seen one.  Continuing with that theme, I thought it might be interesting to take a closer look into a salt marsh.  This is a trickier proposition because, well, what is a typical salt marsh?  Some of them grow in muddy waters next to oyster reefs, or they can be found along beaches, in wide expanses or in small islands just off the coast.  I’ll keep today’s imaginary journey confined to marshes in St. Joseph Bay, where Randall Hughes conducts her biodiversity study- that is what I am most familiar with.

Continue reading

This is what an oyster reef looks like…

Rob Diaz de Villegas WFSU-TV

IMG_3499

The photo above is my work computer’s desktop picture. Most of the time, when people see it, I find that they had no idea what an oyster reef looked like.  One coworker thought it was a muddy cabbage patch.  To be honest, until I first stepped on one for this project, I wouldn’t have known a reef from a pile of rocks.  And, like a lot of people, I love eating the things- right out of the shell with a little grit and juice.  That’s the disconnect we sometimes have between the food we eat and from where it comes.  So it occurred to me that, while we’ve been talking these last few months about the complex relationships between predators and prey on the reef, it might be helpful to get back to oyster basics.  Over the following weeks, we’ll cover various topics (like why subtidal oysters are harvested more often than intertidal ones like those up there).  We’ll start with what it’s actually like out on a reef, and what you’d see there.

Continue reading